Skip to main content

About your Search

20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
coming up is the so-called debt ceiling -- something most americans hadn't even heard of before two years ago. i want to be clear about this. the debt ceiling is not a question of authorizing more spending. raising the debt ceiling does not authorize more spending. it simply allows the country to pay for spending that congress has already committed to. these are bills that have already been racked up and we need to pay them. so while i'm willing to compromise and find common ground over how to reduce our deficits, america cannot afford another debate with this congress about whether or not they should pay the bills they've already racked up. if congressional republicans refuse to pay america's bills on time, social security checks and veterans' benefits will be delayed. we might not be able to pay our troops, or honor our contracts with small business owners. food inspectors, air traffic controllers, specialists who track down loose nuclear material wouldn't get their paychecks. investors around the world will ask if the united states of america is, in fact, a safe bet. markets could go h
the debt ceiling, or exercise the responsibility that they have kept for themselves and raise the debt ceiling, because this is about paying the bills. this is not a complicated concept. you do not go out to dinner and then eat all you want and then leave without paying the check. if you do, you are breaking the law. congress should think about the same way the american people do. if congress wants to say maybe we should go to a more modest restaurant, that's fine. in order to curb our appetite, we're not going to pay the people who already provided the insurance, already front of the money. that is not showing any discipline. that is just not meeting obligations. you cannot do that. that is not a credible way to run the government. we cannot going from crisis to crisis when there is a path in front of us that require stability and compromise. that's how this goes. that is how this needs to work. >> thank you, mr. president. binding votes for the debt ceiling can sometimes be complicated. in previous aspects of american history, president reagan, president h. w. bush, president clinton
, are you with us? caller tell why does it cost so much for an inauguration when the debt ceiling is so high? why not take those donations and put it towards the debt? guest: de $100 million or so that will be paid by the federal government, when you see the inauguration on television, you are not seeing a lot of that security. these professionals are prepared for all sorts of things to happen. metro in washington, d.c., will be running at rush-hour levels. all of this infrastructure needs to be constructed. host: a question about the money that people give, when you're asked how they could give money to organizing for action. will they be accepting donations? what will the money be used for? guest: they will take the donations and they said how it will be used to organize grass- roots democratic priorities. gun control is a great example. host: we will talk for a moment as the president's motorcade had for the national sert -- the national cemetery. the motorcade makes its way past the hour camera here. -- passed our camera here. >> you can leave your stuff right here. >> ok, do not worry.
's in south carolina. and this headline in the aiken standard -- then, on the debt ceiling debate, the ways and means chairman has announced there will be hearings on this on january 22. they will be taking a look and that. also in the newspapers this morning, here's the "washington times with this headline -- " he will be our guest coming up, the top democrat on the ways and means committee in the house. later, we will talk to the chairman of the house judiciary committee, representative goodlatte, on the washington journal this morning as well. two members of congress. continuing with the debt ceiling, the financial times this morning reports -- on the nomination of chuck hagel, a former nebraskahe ka senator.m he won the support of two key members. his opposition so far has come almost entirely from fellow republicans. those are some of the headlines this morning in the papers. back to our question, do you support executive action on gun- control measures? now to an independent caller. caller: hi. i just wonder if there are any human beings left. the underlying issue has very little to d
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)